CrystalBrook Burmese © TR Whitmore 2011

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CrystalBrook Burmese

 v 08

Personality

The Burmese is very friendly inquisitive cat with an outgoing, loving nature - this is why Burmese are one of the most popular breeds. It has been said that the Burmese are more like dogs than cats in their behaviour. When encouraged from kitten hood, they will fetch. They will greet you at the door when you come home and comfort you when you are ill or unhappy - they give unconditional love.


The Burmese is an upfront cat, not left out of where it is all happening. It's a participator - alert, curious, intelligent, interfering and gregarious: you cannot ignore it! When you sit down, the Burmese thinks you are offering him a warm and comfortable bed. When you kneel to weed the garden, the Burmese will use your back as a vantage -point from which to observe the environment. When you do your daily chores in the house, the Burmese will assume that your shoulder is the best place from where tasks can be assisted.


The Burmese likes to explore the environment. Anything that is mechanical and moves makes a good game for the Burmese. They understand door handles very quickly, and the owners often have to fit door levers upside down. Height is not deterrent. Very muscular, the Burmese loves to jump on the tops of doors  and surprise unwary visitors. Nevertheless, Burmese do settle down as they grow out of adolescence and they can be trained by saying NO! kindly and firmly, but you need to start early and may need to persist, because the Burmese are very strong-minded and they effortlessly rule their families.


Even though the Burmese is an ideal breed for families, children and older people - for those who want a less interactive pet, one that will spend all its time in relaxation, the Burmese is not the right choice. Also, the social nature of the Burmese does mean that they need company - human and feline. Toys cannot replace this company. Therefore it is important that, when the owner is at work, to buy two Burmese kittens, ideally from the same litter. That way the stress of moving is halved and the cats' temperament is much more relaxed and loving on long run. On the other hand, if they are left in the home on their own they will want to play all night and disturb the owner's sleep, also they will find something to occupy their time. Unfortunately, what they consider fun we call destructive. This principle applies to all cats, but with the more intelligent, social and active breed such as Burmese, it is particularly important that they have company. A happy Burmese is a blessing to the home; an unhappy one can disrupt the household.